SiteLock
Take our short course in minutes: "Do I need to update my estate plan?"

 

Defenders of the above propositions in Amoris Laetitia are in the unenviable position of having at one and the same time to assent (or at least publicly profess to assent) both to the teaching of the Catholic Church and to statements in Amoris Laetitia that, according to any reasonable interpretation, would naturally seem contradict that doctrine. However for the intellect to assent, at the same time, to two contradictory propositions is contrary to its own nature, which is to know the truth. It is impossible for two contradictory propositions to be true at same time; this is the law of non-contradiction. Those who attempt to adhere both to the Catholic faith and these propositions in Amoris Laetitia are forced to violate this first principle of human reasoning, without which it is impossible for human beings to assent to anything as certain. If two contradictory propositions are both held to be true at the same time then this necessarily implies a denial of the existence of an objective truth that can be certainly known by human reason and thus the existence of propositions that can be affirmed as true or false.It is little surprise then to see that a member of the “party” defending Amoris Laetitia is now announcing that, in theology,  two and two can make five, because, to borrow Orwell’s words “it was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it.”

Source: Two and two never make five: Spadaro, Orwell and the certainty of Catholic faith – Voice of the Family

Facebook Comments

Pin It on Pinterest

Fire at will...

Share this with your friends!