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Talk about “hand from the grave” planning:

To date, no one has disputed that cryonics patients are, in fact, dead. In Alcor Life Extension Foundation, Inc. v. Mitchell, the California Department of Health Services refused to issue death certificates and disposition certificates for bodies designated to pass to Alcor, pursuant to the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act. Neither party asserted that the patients weren’t, in fact, dead. The Mitchell Court specifically raised many of the questions being addressed in this article, such as whether such a person in such a position is really, really dead, and what happens to the estate if the person is successfully revived. The Court, however, didn’t answer any of those questions, stating that, “we are confident that those persons who will then head our various branches of government will be far wiser than we and entirely capable of resolving such dilemmatic issues without our assistance.” In other words, determination of death is likely to remain a simple matter for the cryopreserved.

Article here.

And an even more lengthy, law review style article here.

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